Bottle Water vs.Tap Water

Introduction
The fact that it is critical to keep the body extremely hydrated at all times goes without any debate. However, which is the best water to consume? Traditionally, tap water had been the norm in many offices, homes, and schools. However, bottled water has become popular with the increased notion that the water is purer and cleaner than tap water. On the other hand, bottle water can be contaminated thus leaving tap water as the best alternative. The decision to consume tap or bottled water is a personal choice that is supported by numerous factors. Tap water is, however, a better alternative than bottled water as even most of the bottled water are collected from taps and not springs or glaciers.

Body

People with a preference for bottled water believe that the water is purer than tap water. Water manufacturing companies have been able to convince their consumers that their water is collected from pure an unpolluted areas such as spring water and glaciers. Therefore, water from the glaciers and springs is purer than tap water since tap water has to pass through underground pipes and systems thus increasing the risk of contamination (Brebbia, 2015). For instance, the risk of having traces of lead in tap water increases if the water system has aging pipes. Unfortunately, the perception of pure and unpolluted water cannot be validated as unscrupulous water manufacturers can also label and packaged tap water and deceive consumers that the water is pure.

The preference for bottled water over tap water also arises due to the taste. A majority of people who consume bottled water argue that the water tastes better than tap water. Bottled water passes through a series of purification processes thus the minimal risk of experiencing tastes and odors. In contrast, tap water is in an almost natural form thus the risk of experiencing an “earthy” taste. Moreover, there is a risk of rusting of the water pipes thus increasing the occurrence of a “taste” in the water. Bottled water is processed and tested before it is released to the consumers. A guarantee of quality is therefore assured.

The preference for bottled over tap water has also been due to concerns over the safety of the tapped water. A majority of community water systems fail to meet the standards of the safe drinking water Act thus increased the risk of exposure to unsafe water. Moreover, there are concerns that tap water may be more at risk of exposure to germs than bottled water. Water running from taps comes through an underground water system thus the risk of contamination especially in the case of breakages (Gleick, 2010).

On the other hand, proponents of tap water argue that bottled water is an unnecessary expense. Water is a basic necessity for survival thus there is no need for the commodity to be expensive and unaffordable to many consumers. The cost of bottled water is high as the manufacturers have to factor in production and transportation costs. Some manufacturers also strive to make quick profits thus over price their bottled water. In contrast, the cost of tap water is quite low thus making the crucial commodity affordable and accessible to everyone.

Tap water is also a better alternative to bottled water because it has the least negative impact. For bottled water, the manufacturers have to mass produce bottles. Therefore, millions of plastic bottles are then released to the consumers. Without a proper recycling system, the millions of plastic bottles end up as non-biodegradable waste which subsequently increases pollution. Moreover, the production of the plastic bottled also involves the burning of oil which results in the emission of carbon dioxide that in turn affects the ecological system. Water bottles are made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) that releases toxic chemicals including ethylene oxide and benzene (Vesilind, & DiStefano, 2006). In contrast, tap water does not pollute the environment since the water is available directly from the taps and faucets.

Personally, I know tap water is a better option that bottled water. The fact that water is from a bottle does not make it safer. The bottled water could have fetched at a tap and sealed as bottled water thus exposing the drinker to a higher risk of contamination than tap water. Tap water is monitored and regulated for contamination thus ensuring minimal risk to drinkers. The water is also readily available to all and thus can be provided in schools in limitless and affordable supplies. In contrast, bottled water is unnecessarily expensive, yet tap water is just a fraction of that cost (Mackey, & Boulos, 2004). It is true that there are concerns over the quality of tap water and the risk of contamination. However, tap water can be monitored and tested regularly to ensure they are up to the expected standards.

Conclusion

Water is an essential health commodity that is critical for survival. The question of whether to consume bottled or tap water lies on factors related to the risk of contamination, the cost of the water and the sustainability of the water. Bottled water manufacturers promise their consumers that their bottled water is from springs and or glaciers thus it is bottled at its purest form. The reality, however, is that most bottled water comes from tap water; thus manufacturers dupe consumers with false advertisements. Bottled water is also unnecessarily expensive, yet tap water is affordable and accessible to many. Tap water also guarantees the sustainability of the environment as the production of the water does not undergo numerous process. In contrast, bottled water results to millions of plastic bottles that are non-degradable and choke the environment.

Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive mental disease that occurs due to the degeneration of the brain. It can manifest itself in the middle and old age thus causing premature senility. An interest in the disease arises from the fact that the condition affects a person’s cognitive ability. It raises the curiosity of how the brain changes to the extent that a healthy a functioning brain ends up damaged and almost non-functioning. A person that was once healthy and active may have Alzheimer’s disease, resulting in a loss of general body functioning. The cause of Alzheimer’s disease remains unknown although the early onset of the disease is associated with a genetic mutation. The late occurrence of Alzheimer’s disease, however, occurs due to a combination of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors. People with APOE?4, have an increased of early onset of Alzheimer’s disease although people without the gene can also acquire the condition (Villemagne, & Ames, 2013).

Moreover, persons with Down syndrome have an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease because of the existence of the extra chromosome 21 with the gene that produces the harmful amyloid. Conditions such as heart problems, diabetes, and high blood pressure have also been associated with a decline in cognitive functioning that increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. According to Qui & Strauss (2009), approximately 25 million people are affected by Alzheimer’s disease. In the Europe, the age-standardized prevalence in 65+ is 64% for dementia and 4.4% for Alzheimer’s disease. In America, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in individuals over 70 years is 9.7%. The number of people who have Alzheimer’s disease is anticipated to double in the next twenty years.

The first symptom for persons with Alzheimer’s disease is a cognitive impairment that begins to manifest through memory loss. The memory loss may not be immediate, but the individual may start by demonstrating increased forgetfulness and repetition of statements. The mild cognitive impairment may be difficult to detect, but as the condition progresses, it becomes obvious. The individual may demonstrate complete memory loss; he may wander and get the loss (Jack, 2013). The individual may also take longer to perform tasks that he used to take a short duration to complete. In the severest form of the condition, the individual loses the ability to communicate and may not recognize family members.

The symptoms begin and vary with the changes that the brain is experiencing. Alzheimer’s disease is progressive thus the damage to the brain can begin decades before the symptoms begin to show. The brain begins to have abnormal deposits of amyloid plaques and tau tangles (Selkoe, & Hardy, 2016). The result is the healthy neurons stop functioning and lose connections with each other. Damage first begins at the hippocampus, the part responsible for formation of memory. The damage to the hippocampus marks the indicator of the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss.

The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease involves a variety of test, examination and a look at the individual history. A physician may also perform a variety of tests to measure the patients, memory, problem-solving abilities, and language capacity. Laboratory tests such as urine and blood tests may be performed to eliminate other diseases that may manifest similar symptoms. Moreover, a CT, MRI, and PET test may be performed to rule out other possible causes of symptoms. Conditions such as stroke, brain tumors, and Parkinson’s diseases can expose an individual to symptoms such as those of Alzheimer’s disease.

There is no single intervention that is suitable for the management of Alzheimer’s disease. A patient may require a diversity of drugs and intervention to manage the condition (Liu & Shen, 2014). Currently, the emphasis is on helping patients maintain their mental function, manage their behavioral symptoms, and slow down the progression of the disease. There have been intensive studies to develop therapies that target the genetic, molecular and cellular mechanism of the disease. Medication such as donepezil, rivastigmine, and memantine are given to manage mild to severe Alzheimer’s. The drugs work by regulating the neurotransmitters, maintain thinking, memory and the patient’s communication skills. The medication does not work for all patients, while for others it may work for a while before they no longer do.

Unlike factors such as age and genetics that may be uncontrolled about the occurrence of Alzheimer’s disease, lifestyle and health factors can be controlled. Exercise and physical activity can ensure a healthy brain as the activities encourage the formation of blood vessels through the brain. Moreover, exercise and physical activity increase the number of connections between nerve cells thus ensuring a healthy brain. Exercise stimulates the brain thus keeping it healthy and less prone to degeneration. Scientists have also discovered that a healthy diet that is rich in vegetables reduces the rate of cognitive decline (Norton, & Brayne, 2014). Foods containing imega-3 fatty acids such as salmons and fish also reduce the occurrence of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. Moreover, the engagement in mentally stimulating activities such as reading and engaging is sports activities reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Pharmacists as Healthcare Educators: A Case Study in Namrole City

In Namrole City, pharmacists play a pivotal role beyond dispensing medications; they serve as healthcare educators, bridging the gap between medical professionals and the community. This case study explores how pharmacists in Namrole City have embraced their role as educators, contributing significantly to public health and well-being.

 

Pafikotanamrole are trained not only in medication management but also in providing essential health information to patients. This dual expertise enables them to educate the public on various health issues, preventive measures, and proper medication usage. Their accessibility and frequent interactions with patients make them valuable sources of healthcare information.

 

One of the primary responsibilities of pharmacists in Namrole City is to ensure patients understand their prescribed medications. They explain dosage instructions, potential side effects, and interactions with other drugs or foods. This proactive approach minimizes medication errors and improves adherence, ultimately enhancing treatment outcomes.

 

Moreover, pharmacists conduct health screenings and wellness checks, particularly for chronic conditions like diabetes and hypertension. By monitoring key health metrics such as blood pressure and blood glucose levels, they empower patients to manage their conditions effectively. Through personalized counseling, pharmacists educate individuals on lifestyle modifications and the importance of regular health monitoring.

 

In addition to direct patient interactions, pharmacists collaborate closely with other healthcare providers in Namrole City. They participate in interdisciplinary teams to discuss patient care strategies, share insights on medication therapies, and contribute to treatment plans. This collaborative effort ensures holistic patient care and reinforces the pharmacist’s role as a vital member of the healthcare team.

 

Beyond individual patient care, pharmacists in Namrole City engage in community health initiatives. They organize health awareness campaigns, workshops, and seminars on topics such as immunizations, smoking cessation, and healthy aging. These initiatives aim to educate the broader community, promote preventive healthcare practices, and empower individuals to make informed health decisions.

 

The impact of pharmacists as healthcare educators in Namrole City extends beyond the clinical setting. Their proactive involvement in public health initiatives contributes to reducing healthcare disparities and improving overall community health outcomes. By fostering health literacy and promoting disease prevention, pharmacists play a crucial role in enhancing the well-being of Namrole City residents.

 

In conclusion, Pafikotanamrole exemplify the evolving role of healthcare professionals as educators. Through their comprehensive knowledge, patient-centered approach, and community engagement, they not only dispense medications but also educate and empower individuals to take charge of their health. This case study underscores the invaluable contribution of pharmacists in promoting health education and enhancing healthcare delivery in Namrole City.